Cavatappi Vs Cellentani – What’s The Difference?




Some of the most popular pasta types are spaghetti, macaroni, penne, fusilli, lasagna, and many, many others.

But what about the cavatappi vs cellentani comparison?

Is that the same type or two types of pasta? Is there any difference at all?

Here you will learn what’s behind these names and whether they are one or two types of pasta. Let’s start!

Is Callentani The Same As Cavatappi Pasta?

Did you know that there are over 50 different types of pasta?

Pretty impressive, right?

various pasta types

So it isn’t easy to get bored of this versatile food. Some of those types are cellentani and cavatappi and they have widely used all over the world. But are they two pasta types… or is it just one pasta type?

It seems there is no straightforward answer to this question.

Some people think there is no difference between these type types, while others claim these are two different kinds of pasta.

What Is Cavatappi?

Cavatappi is the Italian word for a corkscrew. It is a hollow, spiral-shaped pasta or corkscrew-shaped and smooth in texture.

cavatappi no 87

This pasta type has roots in Southern Italy and to be more specific, in the region of Campania.

It is best used in side dishes, pasta salads, entrées and any type of sauce.

Interesting Fact

People prefer to call it spiral, but there is a whole explanation by mathematicians that it’s mathematically incorrect to call this shape a spiral. 😀

A famous Italian pasta brand Barilla first created this cylindrical corkscrew shape pasta.

What Is Cellentani?

Cellentani translates to whirls in English and that word describes pasta shape.

It is similar to Cavatappi in form but has more ridges (some people claim). This is also short tubular pasta and it is a perfect choice for a pasta salad, with light tomato sauces, pestos, mac and cheese.

cellentali shape

Barilla, already mentioned Italian pasta brand, called their pasta Cellentani in honor of a popular pop singer these days – Adriano Celentano. And Cellentani becomes the trademark name for this pasta type. Barilla uses only that name for this kind of hollow-shaped pasta.

So, what is the truth – these are two types od pasta?

The conclusion is that the most significant difference between these two kinds of pasta is that Cavatappi has fewer ridges than Cellentani.

On the other side, people claim there is no difference between these two types. Because Barilla named the pasta Cellentani, other brands couldn’t use that name since Barilla had trademarked it. So they called that pasta type Cavatappi – which is the Italian word for a corkscrew. Both types have a tubular, corkscrew or coiled spring pasta shapes.

What Is Cellentani/Cavatappi Pasta Used For?

They said that these two pasta types can be used interchangeably in recipes. Both pasta types are ideal for all kinds of sauces, either light or thick.

Also, these two pasta types retain their shape much longer than other pasta types, so you won’t end up with mushy pasta. Both types have the same taste, so it’s up to you which texture you prefer the most.

organic cavatappi

If you prefer a smoother texture choose cavatappi, but for more texture, we suggest you go with cellentani due to its ridges.

We hope that this explanation makes sense to you. And you can choose whose side you are on. 😉

What Pasta is Similar To Cellentani/Cavatappi?

You can substitute these two pasta types with other hollow and tubular-shaped pasta. That includes elbow macaroni, Gemelli, fusilli, rotini, campanelle, etc.

Two Recipes With Cavatappi/Cellentani Pasta

Whichever pasta recipe you choose to make, that tubular-shaped pasta will hold the sauce and ensure that every bite you take is tasteful. Enjoy!

Classic Pasta Salad

classic pasta salad with cavatappi
Allrecipes

AuthorMelissaDifficultyBeginner

Yields16 Servings
Prep Time15 minsCook Time6 minsTotal Time21 mins

 8 oz Cellentani pasta cooked and cooled
 1 cup cherry tomatoes (halved)
 1 green pepper diced
 3.80 oz can sliced olives
 ½ purple onion (diced)
 1 cup mini pepperonis
 ½ cup Italian dressing
 1 tsp salt
 ½ tsp pepper
 2 tbsp parmesan cheese
 1 cup mozzarella pearls

1

Combine cooked pasta, cherry tomatoes, green peppers, olives, onions, pepperonis, Italian dressing, salt, and pepper in a large mixing bowl.

2

Stir until blended.
Add dressing and gently toss together.
Add parmesan cheese and mozzarella pearls and serve.

Ingredients

 8 oz Cellentani pasta cooked and cooled
 1 cup cherry tomatoes (halved)
 1 green pepper diced
 3.80 oz can sliced olives
 ½ purple onion (diced)
 1 cup mini pepperonis
 ½ cup Italian dressing
 1 tsp salt
 ½ tsp pepper
 2 tbsp parmesan cheese
 1 cup mozzarella pearls

Directions

1

Combine cooked pasta, cherry tomatoes, green peppers, olives, onions, pepperonis, Italian dressing, salt, and pepper in a large mixing bowl.

2

Stir until blended.
Add dressing and gently toss together.
Add parmesan cheese and mozzarella pearls and serve.

Pasta Salad

Cavatappi Beef Ragu

cavatappi beef ragu
HelloFresh

AuthorMelissaDifficultyBeginner

Yields2 Servings
Prep Time5 minsCook Time25 minsTotal Time30 mins

 3 oz Carrot
 6 oz Cavatappi pasta
 1 tbsp Italian seasoning
 2 tbsp Cream cheese
 ¼ oz Parsley
 10 oz Ground beef
 14 oz Marinara sauce
 ¼ cup Parmesan Cheese

1

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Wash and dry produce.
Trim, peel, and finely chop carrot.
Pick parsley leaves from stems; roughly chop leaves.

2

Once the water is boiling, add cavatappi to the pot.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until al dente, between 9-11 minutes. Drain.

3

While cavatappi cooks, heat a drizzle of oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add carrot; cook, stirring, until browned and tender, 6-8 minutes.
Season with salt and pepper.

4

Increase heat under pan with carrot to medium-high and add a drizzle of oil. Push the carrot to one side of the pan and add beef to the empty side. Cook, breaking up meat into pieces until browned.
Sprinkle with Italian seasoning. Cook, stirring, until beef is cooked through, 4-6 minutes. Season generously with salt and pepper.
Stir carrot and beef to combine.

5

Stir in marinara and 1⁄3 cup water (½ cup for 4 servings).
Reduce to a simmer and cook until sauce has slightly thickened 3-4 minutes.
Reduce heat to low.

6

Stir in cream cheese until thoroughly combined.
Add drained cavatappi, 1 tbsp butter, and half the chopped parsley; stir until pasta is warmed through, 1-2 minutes.
Season with salt and pepper.

7

Divide pasta between bowls.
Top with Parmesan and remaining chopped parsley.
Serve.

Ingredients

 3 oz Carrot
 6 oz Cavatappi pasta
 1 tbsp Italian seasoning
 2 tbsp Cream cheese
 ¼ oz Parsley
 10 oz Ground beef
 14 oz Marinara sauce
 ¼ cup Parmesan Cheese

Directions

1

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Wash and dry produce.
Trim, peel, and finely chop carrot.
Pick parsley leaves from stems; roughly chop leaves.

2

Once the water is boiling, add cavatappi to the pot.
Cook, stirring occasionally, until al dente, between 9-11 minutes. Drain.

3

While cavatappi cooks, heat a drizzle of oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add carrot; cook, stirring, until browned and tender, 6-8 minutes.
Season with salt and pepper.

4

Increase heat under pan with carrot to medium-high and add a drizzle of oil. Push the carrot to one side of the pan and add beef to the empty side. Cook, breaking up meat into pieces until browned.
Sprinkle with Italian seasoning. Cook, stirring, until beef is cooked through, 4-6 minutes. Season generously with salt and pepper.
Stir carrot and beef to combine.

5

Stir in marinara and 1⁄3 cup water (½ cup for 4 servings).
Reduce to a simmer and cook until sauce has slightly thickened 3-4 minutes.
Reduce heat to low.

6

Stir in cream cheese until thoroughly combined.
Add drained cavatappi, 1 tbsp butter, and half the chopped parsley; stir until pasta is warmed through, 1-2 minutes.
Season with salt and pepper.

7

Divide pasta between bowls.
Top with Parmesan and remaining chopped parsley.
Serve.

Cavatappi Beef Ragu

To Wrap It Up

Everybody loves pasta! It comes in several shapes and sizes but it is a favorite part of the meal. So, cavatappi vs cellentani – here you’ve seen what is the difference between these two types and we actually realized there is any at all. If there is, it’s very small. So now you know you can substitute them for each other and recipe will stay the same.



Ivana
Ivana is always desirable for adventures so she was working in restaurants on the Croatian coast, participated in Caffe barista tournaments, led a gardening business, and more. She is a healthy food enthusiast, prefers vegetarianism, and practices yoga. In her free time, she likes to study ancient Buddhist scriptures as well as psychology.